Man, last week it was the World Wide Web's 25th birthday and this week it's Twitter's 8th birthday. It's as if all of the Internet birthdays are aligning to force us into taking a good look at how we've been spending nearly all of our free time! Hmmm. Rather than take that look, though, let's push it into the part of our brain where we're hiding all of our bad stuff, and check out some more Internet good stuff! This week we have an interview with the wonderful Mike White, an impossible Emoji quiz, an update on Viacom's lawsuit against YouTube, an Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind tour of NYC, and mooore!

  • "I’m happy with a characterization I’ve written when I’ve revealed someone with as many of their good sides and bad sides, and I’ve tried to be sympathetic to them, and honest. No one is purely heroic." For The Believer, Toph Eggers spoke with Mike White about Enlightened, creating female antiheroes, and how he handles failed projects. 
  • In 2009, Louis C.K. joked that the students who ask established actors questions on Inside the Actors Studio are precisely those who never become established actors themselves. (I think it sounds less funny when I type it?) While for the most part that is probably true -- it is sort of hard to become mega-famous -- for one man it most certainly is not true! (Bradley Cooper is that man.) (EVER HEARD OF 'EM?) 
  • A few weeks ago, Community's Gillian Jacobs took Vulture's "Ultimate Emoji Quiz", which tested her ability to decipher Emoji versions of famous movie quotes. She did remarkably well. Vulture has developed another quiz so the rest of us can try our hand at Emoji-movie-quote-guessing, and oh my god it is remarkably difficult. 
  • Art director Adam Stockhausen on creating the world of The Grand Budapest Hotel
     
  • "It’s as if we are standing in the center of a roomful of people, but we don’t know where they’re looking, and we can’t help but feel, both excitedly and uneasily, that they may well be looking at us." For Salon, Rosa Inocencio Smith finds similarities between the paranoid narcism in Dostoevsky's The Double and our relationship with social media. Eek! 
  • The Onion's movie critic, Peter K. Rosenthal, reviews Divergent. (Perfectly.
  • As we mentioned at the top, it's Twitter's 8th birthday! Wow, I can't believe how many years of our lives we've spent refreshing and re-refreshing that little website! To refresh you on exactly just how many years it has been, head over to first-tweets.com and check out your first tweet. (Or don't!) (Remember: you are 100% free to live in first tweet-related ignorance!)  
  • Speaking of #tweets: Splitsider just put together an exhaustive guide to finding your favorite late night and sketch TV show writers on Twitter. It's like it's our birthday, too! (Not really -- a list of our favorite TV writers' Twitter handles would be an intensely bad birthday gift.) (But it's a good blog post!) 
  • Wheel of Fortune contestant Emil made the most insane "Bonus Puzzle" correct first guess possibly ever (based on two letters!) earlier this week. Pat Sajak loved it:
  • Tribeca's Zachary Wigon sat down with director Azazel Jacobs to talk about his new HBO series Doll & Em, which stars Emily Mortimer and Dolly Wells. You should read it, and then you should watch that show!
  • At The Dissolve, Noel Murray takes a close look at A.I.'s (incredibly creepy) "Super Toy Teddy" and Hasbro's (also incredibly creepy) real-life version.  
  • "What sex was for the Puritans, technology has become for us. We’ve focussed our collective anxiety on digital excess, and reconnecting with the “real” world around us represents one effort to control it." Casey N. Cep on the pointlessness of unplugging
  • Ahead of the release of Muppets Most Wanted, Devon Maloney put together 12 of the most depressing Muppet moments ever. Fun!
  • To end on a less depressing note, let me ask: are you watching Fuse's Billy on the Street? If you're not: WHY NOT?! Here's a clip featuring Lena Dunham and fan-favorite Elena